Freeletics Reivew - Working out at home
Fitness,  Reviews

Freeletics Review – Can a Fitness App be *Too* Customizable?

In the past couple of years, I’ve become a bit of a fitness app junkie. I love the convenience of being able to work out from home with just my trusty Bmat and my phone.

I like to mix it up now and then so I don’t get bored. I heard that Freeletics was basically like having a virtual personal trainer and thought it might be fun to try it out.

After giving the program a whirl, I thought I’d share this Freeletics review to help you determine if it’s the right app for reaching your fitness goals.

Don’t have time for the full review? Scroll down to the bottom for the Quick FAQ!

** My blog posts contain affiliate links, which means that I may earn a commission on purchases you make after clicking on those links. (At no extra cost to you!) Full disclosure here. **

Disclaimer: This is not a sponsored post and I am not in any way affiliated with Freeletics. These are my honest thoughts and opinions after using the app myself.

What is Freeletics?

Freeletics is a fitness app you can download on your phone. It features highly customizable fitness programs that can be done with nothing more than your body weight, making it ideal for those who want to work out at home but have limited equipment. 

If you do have some gym equipment at home, you can indicate this in the settings and the app will incorporate them into your workout program. 

The exercises consist of HIIT sessions (High-Intensity Interval Training) that are roughly 30 minutes long.

What makes Freeletics unique from other fitness apps is that the programs are not only customizable, but they actually change as you go based on your feedback to your virtual “coach” after each workout.

This feature strives to be the next best thing to a real personal trainer, by adjusting the difficulty so that you always feel challenged without getting overwhelmed.

Is Freeletics free?

Nope. Despite having the word “free” in its name, the Freeletics app is available by paid subscription only.

The options depend on whether you want just the training, or a nutrition plan as well.

I’m not one for nutrition plans (I prefer to eat what I want and just keep track of my calories and macros with Cronometer) so I opted for the 3-month subscription to the training only, which works out to just under 40 USD. However, the more months you buy up front, the better the savings. For 80 USD you can get a whole year of Freeletics.

It sounds like a lot of money, but really it works out to less than $4 a week (or even less depending on the plan you choose.)

So really, one can’t gripe about the price. All you need to do is skip your daily Starbucks habit for 1 week and you’ll have the cash for this.

Is Freeletics good for building muscle or losing weight?

The nice thing about this app is that it is designed to help you achieve specific fitness goals. If your focus is on building muscle, you can indicate this to your “coach” during the assessment, and it will suggest programs for you that center more on strength training. If weight loss is a bigger priority, it will suggest programs with more cardio.

I also thought it was cool that you could prioritize other goals as well, like if you’re exercising primarily for stress relief or for increased endurance.

Program Overview

Once you sign up, the app asks for your stats (age, gender, weight, height, etc.) and asks you questions about how often you work out and your overall perceived fitness level.

 

Once you finish the assessment, the app offers a selection of recommended programs or “Training Journeys”. You can tap on each of the recommended programs and read about what to expect, what kind of equipment you will need, and how long the sessions are.

I went with a 12-week program called “Natural Tone” which focuses more on building muscle than cardio.

The program is loosely grouped into three parts:

  • Week one: Assessment
  • Weeks 2-11: Custom Training
  • Week 12: “Hell Week” (Uh, Yay?)

From there you can choose how many days per week you want to train, if you have any physical limitations, and if you want to incorporate sprints or runs.

When you select the workout, it gives you an outline of what you’ll be doing, and also a preview of the exercises that you can review before you start.

Other Features

If you’re not into a structured program, you can pick and choose from individual workouts. For some reason,  these workouts all have names from Greek Mythology. (The Morpheus workout, anyone?)

You can also focus on single exercises, but I don’t really get the purposes of this. Do you really need an app to do 20 situps and nothing else? 

There’s another feature which locates nearby spots where you can train for free or meet other Freeletics users. But considering the whole point of my downloading an app like this is so I can live like a hermit and not leave my house, this function went wholly unused.

My Freeletics experience

I like that there are video loops of the exercises so it’s always easy to see what I’m supposed to be doing at any given time. I also like that it’s self-paced and you simply swipe to the next exercise once you’ve finished your reps.

But getting through the sessions did seem to take a bit too long, clocking in around 45 minutes. I feel like an HIIT session doesn’t need to be longer than 30.

Although there’s an option to tell your “coach” that you only have 15 minutes, I would have appreciated more options for session length.

I also found that there’s a lot of fiddling around within the app in order to get through all the exercises. Each workout is broken into 5 or 6 segments that you must complete separately.

I found this really broke the flow of my workout. I don’t mind swiping to the next exercise, but to keep starting and stopping between each segment was annoying.

The workouts also aren’t as fun as other programs I’ve tried. I don’t know if it’s just the black and grey color scheme or the app’s layout, but it just doesn’t get me pumped up as a good fitness program should.

Sadly, my Freeletics review doesn’t contain a before and after, or even any results. I just didn’t like the app enough to get that far!

After just a couple workouts, I ended up quitting Freeletics in lieu of another run through of the Bodyboss Method.

Freeletics review: is this app an effective way to get fit?

Freeletics review summary

As with any app, Freeletics has it’s pros and cons. At the end of the day, it is a matter of preference. If you’re looking for a highly customizable training program, Freeletics has a lot to offer.

But while I can appreciate the variety of workouts and constantly evolving program, the app ended up being a bit too fussy for me and left me longing for a simpler workout program where I know exactly what to expect from one week to the next.

Pros:

  • Unisex: the app appeals to both men and women
  • Low subscription costs compared to most other apps
  • Highly customizable and evolving based on your equipment and current athletic ability

Cons:

  • App could be better designed: Feels like a lot of swiping, tapping, and fussing around to get through the day’s workouts
  • Because workout program evolves as you go, exercises are not predictable from one week to the next. (Might be a pro for some, but for me it’s a con!)

Bottom line: While this Freeletics review isn’t exactly a “thumbs down”, this app just isn’t for me!

Freeletics Alternatives

By this point, you might be wondering about the best Freeletics alternative. My number one go-to for home HIIT workouts is the Bodyboss Method. (I recently became an affiliate for them but this was still my preference for 2 years before that!)

You can read my full review about it here.

In a nutshell, I like the Bodyboss program best because:

  • It’s a one-time purchase and you have access to the 16-week program forever
  • The online edition comes with workout videos that you can work out along with
  • Workouts are fun and even addicting!
  • Online Facebook community is a fantastic source of support and encouragement
  • When I did the program the first time I was seeing results after less than a month

My second favorite fitness program is the Bikini Body Guide by Kayla Itsines via the SWEAT app. It’s a monthly subscription that’s a bit pricier than Freeletics. But you get access to a ton of fun workouts, and the app is really well designed. Read the full review here.

However, if you love the idea of an ongoing, highly-customized workout experience, than Aaptiv is the app for you.

If traditional workouts aren’t really your thing, you can also try dancing your way to fitness with a program like Figure 8

Lastly, if you need to get fit on the cheap, you can always download my free workout builder. Click here to read more about it!

What did you think about this Freeletics review? Have you tried it? Let me know in the comments!

The Quick n’ Dirty Freeletics FAQ!

How does the Freeletics app work?

Freeletics is a fitness app you can download on your phone. What makes Freeletics unique from other fitness apps is that the programs are not only customizable, but they actually change as you go based on your feedback to your virtual “coach” after each workout.

Is Freeletics good for building muscle or weight loss?

The nice thing about this app is that it is designed to help you achieve specific fitness goals. If your focus is on building muscle, you can indicate this to your “coat” during the assessment, and it will suggest programs for you that center more on strength training. If weight loss is a bigger priority, it will suggest programs with more cardio exercises.

How much does Freeletics cost?

It depends on if you just want the training or the nutrition plan as well. The more months you buy upfront, the better the savings. For 80 USD, you can get a whole year of Freeletics training.

Does Freeletics really work?

If you follow the app’s instructions, it will help you get in shape. It is highly customizable and really is almost like having a virtual personal trainer. However, the app is a bit complicated-feeling and some people may prefer a more straight-forward fitness program.

Corrie Alexander is a blogger, freelancer, fitness enthusiast, and founder of The Fit Careerist. A proponent of personal growth and a self-proclaimed fitness app-junkie, Corrie is committed to testing and reviewing the latest workout programs in order to help others decide on the best exercise plan for them. She completed Felix Harder's Health And Wellness Coaching Certification in 2020 in order to more effectively help others on their fitness journey.

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